PyCon 2013

I’ve spent the last week hanging out in Silicon Valley for PyCon as well as to hang out with my co-workers. This year’s experience was very different from the previous years, which I can probably attribute to a couple things.

First, I drove down with my friend and co-worker Rob Hudson, which allowed me to bring my bicycle. Having a way to get around that isn’t just relying on the public transit is pretty amazing. I’ve gotten lost a few times but overall it has been pretty fantastic. It also means I am not getting out of the habit of spending time on my bicycle each morning and evening.

Second, I am sharing a house with co-workers and new friends of mine (Tarek, Alexis, Oliver, and Julien) which changes things pretty drastically. I no longer go back to a lonely hotel room, I have a comfortable house with friends. I can cook breakfast or dinner, spend time chatting with about code, projects and linguistics until late into the night, etc. It also means I am forced to explore the surrounding area a bit since I bike through it.

Finally, I am a Mozilla employee this year. I am not a funemployed guy who has only worked at small time startups, instead I’ve worked on a high scale website at a company that plenty of people can recognize.

It has been a wonderful time at PyCon, I have another day of sprints left, then I head to MV to hang out with my co-workers for a day before I take the long train ride back to Portland.

pytmux Released

So this last weekend I wrote a tool named pytmux. It is a basic session builder/wrapper around tmux so you can get going faster when you start up your system. It uses a JSON based config files, is pretty minimal right now, but I hope to make it better in the future as I use it more.

The idea is you specify what you want a session to look like in JSON, like so:

{
    "name": "wraithan.net",
    "windows": [
        {
            "name": "editor",
            "command": "workon wraithan.net && emacs"
        },
        {
            "command": "workon wraithan.net && make regenerate"
        },
        {
            "command": "workon wraithan.net && git pull"
        }
    ]
}

Then you run:

pytmux run wraithan.net  # This is keyed off of file name.

And blamo! It builds a session as well as it can. It also has convenience commands like pytmux list, pytmux edit <config>, and pytmux doctor. Which you can learn about in the README currently. Better docs (such as sphinx on RTD) in the future if that is really needed.

Anyway, I hope y’all like it. Feel free to open issues on the tracker on GitHub if there are any features missing that you’d like.